Seven Thousand Ways to Listen: Staying Close to What is Sacred (Simon and Schuster)

Although I am still reading it, I wanted to share this wonder-filled book by Mark Nepo. With life affirming stories and lovely poems, Mark encourages us as we travel our human journey to not loose touch with the most sacred things in life. Beautifully suited for individual meditations or small group study. I highly recommend Seven Thousand Ways to Listen: Staying Close to What is Sacred by Mark Nepo!

 

Thrive: The Third Metric to Redefining Success and Creating a Life of Well-Being, Wisdom, and Wonder

Arianna Huffington’s book Thrive is one of the best contemporary, non religious books I’ve read in years! There is a wealth of health-full, life-full information here. I listened to the audio version on Audible.com which was read by Agape Stassinopoulos, Arianna’s sister. It was beautifully written, produced, and narrated. I highly recommend Thrive by Arianna Huffington!

Praying in Color: Drawing a New Path to God (Brewster, MA: Paraclete Press, 2007)

Praying in Color: Drawing a New Path to God by Sybil Mac Beth is a fresh new way to approach your prayer time. While invoking your creativity, you can contemplate on the issues, people, places and things that you are bringing to God. I have found this avenue of prayer to be relaxing yet inspirational all at the same time.

Praying with the Body: Bringing the Psalms to Life (Paraclete Press, 2009)

If you are looking for a way to combine your exercise time and devotional time, I have the book for you! In Praying with the Body not only you will learn how to implement praying the psalms while doing yoga type poses you will also be able to keep three of the Liturgical prayer hours. This is a beautifully written and designed book. You may want to also check out the other books in the Active Prayer Series. 

Being Still: Reflections on an Ancient Mystical Tradition (Paulist Press, 2003)

Being Still: Reflections on an Ancient Mystical Tradition

by

Jean-Yves Leloup

 

 

 

If you read a lot of books in a specific category over time you run across the names of certain books by certain authors regularly. Jean-Yves Leloup’s Being Still is a case in point. I’ve been seeing this name referenced in many books I’ve read over the last few years. Finally, I was able to purchase it! I’m not finished reading it yet, but I wanted to go ahead and share it with you because it fits with our topic of Stillness this week.

Being Still by Jean-Yves Leloup is rich with church history, monastic tradition and truths that apply the contemplative path to our hurried lives today. This isn’t a fast read. Rather it’s one you will want to take slowly and soak in. Though it isn’t designed to be a devotional, I am using it in that way. If you are at all interested in monastic ways, I highly recommend Being Still: Reflections on an Ancient Mystical Tradition by Jean-Yves Leloup.

Book Review

New Seeds of Contemplation by Thomas Merton

 

New Seeds of Contemplation

by

Thomas Merton

 

A 20th Century Christian mystic, Thomas Merton is far and away one of my favorite authors. Although I haven’t read all his books yet, New Seeds of Contemplation is in my mind his greatest work. Without a doubt a modern spiritual classic.

The depth of Merton’s spiritual understanding is difficult to grasp. His words are soothing as a pool of cool water. I want to swim in them for hours.

“Every moment and every event of every man’s life on earth plants something in his soul. For just as the wind carries thousands of winged seeds, so each moment brings with it germs of spiritual vitality that come to rest imperceptibly in the minds and wills of men. Most of these unnumbered seeds perish and are lost, because men are not prepared to receive them: for such seeds as these cannot spring up anywhere except in the soil of freedom, spontaneity and love.” ~ Thomas Merton

In New Seeds of Contemplation Merton takes us to deeper levels in our spiritual walk, teaching us about faith and humility, thoughtfully helping us to find our true identity in Christ. If you are on a serious spiritual growth path, seeking a clearer understanding of your relationship to God, this is the book for you. 

My feeble words fail when trying to describe the magnificence of Thomas Merton’s writing. Poetic, transcending, life-changing, mesmerizing, core-cutting, astounding, incredibly perfect, a true gift from God. It leaves me almost breathless… Always wanting more. 

The highest of recommendations from my bookshelf. READ THIS BOOK!

 

09.24.14

BOOK REVIEW

Deep-Rooted in Christ: The Way of Transformation by Joshua Choonmin Kang

 

Deep-Rooted in Christ: The Way of Transformation

by

Joshua Choonmin Kang

In January 2008, I was introduced to Joshua Choonmin Kang when Renavare` suggested their followers read Deep-Rooted in Christ together that year. Because I am such a fan of Richard Foster and the Renovare`organization, I was confident the book would be amazing. I was not disappointed. In the tradition of classic spiritual writers, Joshua uses the spiritual disciplines to show us the path to Christlikeness. Written with 52 short chapters it is perfect for a weekly devotional. There is so much life changing wisdom that once through barely skims the surface. I’ve read this sweet book several times since I first got it. If you are looking for a new devotional for the upcoming year or perhaps a Christmas gift, I would highly recommend Joshua Choonmin Kang’s beautifully written book Deep-Rooted in Christ: The Way of Transformation. I’m looking forward to reading it again myself.

11.27.13

Take Your Life Back (Tyndale House Publishers, 2016)

Arterburn and Stoop have done it again! I’ve been reading their work for 11 years and I’m never disappointed. Besides the Life Recovery Bible this new book is my favorite of their many writing projects.

In Take Your Life Back: How to Stop Letting the Past and Other People Control You Stephen Arterburn and David Stoop take turns sharing life stories to help us learn about our own dependencies and struggles. Not being written in recovery vernacular makes this book a bit more friendly to those unfamiliar with the terminology. It’s primarily written for the co-dependent type (which most of us are) but it still touches on many issues specific to other addicts also. I highly recommend Take Your Life Back for everyone no matter your background or type of struggle. You will find yourself, your issues and answers somewhere in these pages.